Bold ideas and critical thoughts on science.
The (potential) impact of AI on the individual research process and  science in general

The (potential) impact of AI on the individual research process and  science in general

To launch our new section ‘AI in Research’ Sascha Schönig spoke to Theresa Züger, head of the Public Interest AI research group, about the influence of AI on her personal day-to-day work in research, as well as on the science system as a whole. She gave some exciting insights about the risks and opportunities AI bears for research work and talked about tools her team is developing at the Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society.

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ChatGPT and other generative AI applications have once again cast the spotlight on AI and its purpose in academic research. Heralded by some as the ultimate time-saver and means to ease administrative burdens, its reception in academic circles varies. How much do researchers actually know about this technology and how it works? Critical voices express reservations about the potential negative implications AI has on the integrity of research as well as cite the potential harmful practices related to the dissemination of bias and inaccurate information. This debate surrounding the involvement of AI in research is fervent among academics, policymakers and legal experts, centering on the question: What role should AI have in the research process?

In this special issue, we explore the role of AI in the research process. Submissions may address, but are not limited to the following topics:

  • The challenges, dangers and opportunities AI presents for research
  • Ethical and legal considerations associated with using AI in research
  • Skill sets and competencies researchers need to use AI
  • AI’s influence on authorship and publishing practices
  • Comparative analysis of AI & research practices across diverse academic disciplines and geographical contexts

Contribute

You are more than welcome to contribute to this Special Issue. Just drop us a line with your idea.
If you want to learn more about our formats, check out how we do things. If you want to stay up to date, subscribe to our newsletter.

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In light of the current war in the Ukraine we have decided to open a telegram group and a telegram bot which will provide information on support for researchers and students from Ukraine.
We will open the group so that information can be exchanged, knowledge shared and advice given. In the upcoming weeks we will post recommendations, initiatives, share interviews and experiences and try to provide as much information as possible that could be useful in any way. Our approach is a collaborative, bottom-up one – so feel free to contribute with relevant information.

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Do you dare? What female scientists expect when communicating

Do you dare? What female scientists expect when communicating

Scientists are increasingly expected to engage with the public. At the same time, they face increasing hostility when they speak out. Female scientists, as a more frequent target of sexist hostility, fear being attacked and enjoy speaking out less than their male counterparts. The question arises: Is science communication really feasible for everyone in the current hostile environment? This short analysis focuses on female scientists as a subgroup of a large survey sample and how their assessment of public engagement differs from that of their male counterparts.

What happens to science when it communicates?

What happens to science when it communicates?

In August 2023 Benedikt Fecher conducted an interview with Clemens Blümel from the German Centre for Higher Education Research and Science Studies (DZHW) on the topic of ‘what happens when science opens up and communicates’ and the emerging challenges for future scientific communication.